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El Cajon police say unarmed black man pointed vape at officer before he was shot to death

Boing Boing -

Alfred Okwera Olango, who was black, was fatally shot by police in El Cajon, California on Tuesday. Police in the San Diego suburb city say the 38 year old Ugandan immigrant pointed a vape pen or e-cigarette device at them, before police shot the man to death.

Officers were responding to a call of a man behaving erratically, and walking in traffic. Olango's friends and supporters say court records show that he suffered from mental illness, and may have been experiencing a seizure before his death. An El Cajon police officer is believed to have shot Olango within as little as one or two minutes after arriving at the scene.

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Commodore C64 Survives Over 25 Years Balancing Drive Shafts In Auto Repair Shop

Slashdot -

MojoKid writes: One common gripe in the twenty-first century is that nothing is built to last anymore. Even complex, expensive computers seem to have a relatively short shelf-life nowadays. However, one computer in a small auto repair shop in Gdansk, Poland has survived for the last twenty-five years against all odds. The computer in question here is a Commodore C64 that has been balancing driveshafts non-stop for a quarter of a century. The C64C looks like it would fit right in with a scene from Fallout 4 and has even survived a nasty flood. This Commodore 64 contains a few homemade aspects, however. The old computer uses a sinusoidal waveform generator and piezo vibration sensor in order to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The C64C interprets these signals to help balance the driveshafts in vehicles. The Commodore 64 (also known as the C64, C-64, C= 64) was released in January 1982 and still holds the title for being the best-selling computer of all time.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Time to Kill Security Questions-or Answer Them With Lies

LXer -

The notion of using robust, random passwords has become all but mainstream-by now anyone with an inkling of security sense knows that "password1" and "1234567" aren't doing them any favors. But even as password security improves, there's something even more problematic that underlies them: security questions.

Is the Linux kernel a security problem?

LXer -

Security is an ongoing issue for all operating systems, including Linux. While Linux has generally had a good reputation compared to Windows when it comes to security, no operating system is perfect. A writer at Ars Technica recently examined the issue of security and the Linux kernel.

New to Bitcoins

Bitcoin feeds -

I have a gaming pc (i7-6700k and R9 390) and was wondering if bitcoin mining is a good deal because they are over $600. I know that mining takes time from your gpu, but couldn't I just upgrade to a better gpu when I get some bitcoins? Am I missing (...)

Unsafe at any clock speed: Linux kernel security needs a rethink

LXer -

The Linux kernel today faces an unprecedented safety crisis. Much like when Ralph Nader famously told the American public that their cars were "unsafe at any speed" back in 1965, numerous security developers told the 2016 Linux Security Summit in Toronto that the operating system needs a total rethink to keep it fit for purpose.

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