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Rocket Labs Picks New Zealand For Its Launch Site

Slashdot -

schwit1 writes: The small sat rocket company Rocket Labs has chosen a location in New Zealand as its future launch site. Bloomberg reports: "The company didn't specify how much it was investing in the site, which is due to be completed in the fourth quarter. New Zealand, which has been used in the past by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, is considered a prime location because rockets launched from that deep in the Southern hemisphere can reach a wide range of Earth orbits. Rocket Lab's remote site on the Kaitorete Spit in the Canterbury region also means it has less air and sea traffic, which translates into more frequent launches and economies of scale, the company said. It also will no longer compete for airspace with the U.S. government." Rocket Labs will have to actually launch something to really make the competition heat up. This announcement, however, illustrates that in the long run, the United States has some significant disadvantages as a spaceport location.

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Egreat i6 mini PC giveaway

Liliputing -

The Egreat i6 is a small computer with Windows 8.1 with Bing software, an Intel Atom Bay Trail processor, HDMI and VGA ports, and dual-band WiFi. Geekbuying sells the Egreat i6 for about $140, but the store provided us with a demo unit to review. While it has a few odd software quirks, it offers […]

Egreat i6 mini PC giveaway is a post from: Liliputing

Confirmed stupid: A patent on firewalls, circa 2000

LXer -

Last month, the EFF faced down a lawsuit claiming that one of its "Stupid Patent of the Month" blog posts illegally defamed the inventor, a patent lawyer named Scott Horstemeyer. Days after the lawsuit became public, it was dropped.

The Plan To Bring Analytics To eSports

Slashdot -

An anonymous reader writes: We're used to seeing instant replays, halftime analysis and in depth analytics in traditional sports, but now they're coming to eSports too. A new start-up, Dojo Madness, is hoping to bring the same techniques to games like League of Legends and Dota, in the hopes players can learn from their mistakes in a game when shown them. In a new interview, founder and former Electronic Sports League boss Jens Hilgers reveals that the company's main product, Dota training and replay site Bruce.GG, will use machine learning to teach itself what are good and bad plays — and he hopes to bring the tech to other games, like Counter-Strike, too. "The feedback of the users watching these videos, these input points, are allowing us to determine the relevancy of what we have done and the system will learn from that and get smarter," he says.

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