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How To Find the Right Open Source Project To Get Involved With

Slashdot -

An anonymous reader writes Writing on Opensource.com, Matt Micene shares his thoughts on getting started with an open source project. "I came back from OSCON this year with a new fire to contribute to an open source project. I've been involved in open source for years, but lately I've been more of an enthusiast-evangelist than a hands-on-contributor to an open source community. So, I started some thinking about what to do next. When I was involved in projects before, it was due to a clear progression from user to forum guru to contributor. It's a great path to take but what do you do if you just want to jump into something?" Matt goes on to lay out several steps to help new contributors get started.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








US might keep Bagram secret prison detainees even after end of Afghan War

RT -

Journalist Jessica Donati reported for Reuters on Monday this week that the status of an undisclosed number of individuals under American custody at a facility to the north of the Afghan capital is becoming “increasingly urgent” because the US will not have the right to hold them once the 13-year-old war concludes in the coming months.

Little is known about the prisoners — including their identities or how many are even in American custody — but Donati says that the legal power that has let authorities continue to keep the detainees under US control during the duration of the Afghan War will soon expire. Officials at that point will be left to decide where and how the men will be moved from a prison on the outskirts of the infamous Bagram airfield, and achieving such an answer isn’t all that easy, according to the reporter.

Brigadier General Patrick Reinert, the commanding general of the United States Army Reserve Legal Command, told Reuters that the individuals in question are all foreign nationals that have been captured by the US on battlefields around the globe and ultimately ended up being held near the Bagram airfield where the US previously maintained a facility that spawned an international scandal concerning widespread abuses nearly a decade ago.

With operations within Afghanistan soon ceasing, Reinert told Reuters that the individuals in custody could be transferred into the US court system or, if no other option is feasible, added to the pool of detainees held at the Pentagon-maintained facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Sending the men back to their home countries might not be a possibility, Reinert warned, because US requires that those nations first promise that the prisoners won’t be prosecuted or subjected to inhumane conditions.

"We've got to resolve their fate by either returning them to their home country or turning them over to the Afghans for prosecution or any other number of ways that the Department of Defense has to resolve," he told Reuters. "Until the country provides assurances, the individual cannot be transferred.”

Going to Guantanamo is highly unlikely, Donati added, due to mounting pressure for the White House to close the facility as promise by US President Barack Obama before he campaigned for the oval office and after his victories in 2008 and 2012. According to recent statistics published by the New York Times, 149 detainees remain held at Gitmo despite the president’s vows to close the prison.

Upon publication of the Reuters article, the Center for Constitutional Rights, a New York City-based organization that advocates for protecting basic freedoms, tweeted that the claim that Guantanamo remains open because there is nowhere to send the detainees is “demonstrably false.” With regards to the individuals being moved from Afghanistan, however, human rights activists say that allowing the detainees to remain under US custody no matter where would be trouble.

.@ReutersWorld, the claim that #Guantanamo remains open b/c there is nowhere to send the detainees is demonstrably false.

— The CCR (@theCCR) September 29, 2014

"It would be an absolute nightmare if that happened ... We don't even know who they are ... Our effort is to ensure all Pakistanis are back before the end of December," Maryam Haq, a lawyer with the Justice Project Pakistan, told Reuters.

Thirty-nine Pakistanis have been released from Bagram in the past 10 months, China’s Xinhua Net reported last week, leaving reportedly just one Pakistani in US custody there. With regards to the total number of detainees held in Bagram, however, Donati acknowledged that such a statistic is not available.

“Almost nothing is known of the detainees' identities. The United States has declined to disclose their nationalities, where they were captured and how many are still in its custody,” she wrote, adding that the Justice Project Pakistan groups believes that some are from Yemen, Russia and Saudi Arabia and, if recent reports are accurate, amount to less than 50 individuals in custody.

US might keep Bagram secret prison detainees even after end of Afghan War

RT -

Journalist Jessica Donati reported for Reuters on Monday this week that the status of an undisclosed number of individuals under American custody at a facility to the north of the Afghan capital is becoming “increasingly urgent” because the US will not have the right to hold them once the 13-year-old war concludes in the coming months.

Little is known about the prisoners — including their identities or how many are even in American custody — but Donati says that the legal power that has let authorities continue to keep the detainees under US control during the duration of the Afghan War will soon expire. Officials at that point will be left to decide where and how the men will be moved from a prison on the outskirts of the infamous Bagram airfield, and achieving such an answer isn’t all that easy, according to the reporter.

Brigadier General Patrick Reinert, the commanding general of the United States Army Reserve Legal Command, told Reuters that the individuals in question are all foreign nationals that have been captured by the US on battlefields around the globe and ultimately ended up being held near the Bagram airfield where the US previously maintained a facility that spawned an international scandal concerning widespread abuses nearly a decade ago.

With operations within Afghanistan soon ceasing, Reinert told Reuters that the individuals in custody could be transferred into the US court system or, if no other option is feasible, added to the pool of detainees held at the Pentagon-maintained facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Sending the men back to their home countries might not be a possibility, Reinert warned, because US requires that those nations first promise that the prisoners won’t be prosecuted or subjected to inhumane conditions.

"We've got to resolve their fate by either returning them to their home country or turning them over to the Afghans for prosecution or any other number of ways that the Department of Defense has to resolve," he told Reuters. "Until the country provides assurances, the individual cannot be transferred.”

Going to Guantanamo is highly unlikely, Donati added, due to mounting pressure for the White House to close the facility as promise by US President Barack Obama before he campaigned for the oval office and after his victories in 2008 and 2012. According to recent statistics published by the New York Times, 149 detainees remain held at Gitmo despite the president’s vows to close the prison.

Upon publication of the Reuters article, the Center for Constitutional Rights, a New York City-based organization that advocates for protecting basic freedoms, tweeted that the claim that Guantanamo remains open because there is nowhere to send the detainees is “demonstrably false.” With regards to the individuals being moved from Afghanistan, however, human rights activists say that allowing the detainees to remain under US custody no matter where would be trouble.

.@ReutersWorld, the claim that #Guantanamo remains open b/c there is nowhere to send the detainees is demonstrably false.

— The CCR (@theCCR) September 29, 2014

"It would be an absolute nightmare if that happened ... We don't even know who they are ... Our effort is to ensure all Pakistanis are back before the end of December," Maryam Haq, a lawyer with the Justice Project Pakistan, told Reuters.

Thirty-nine Pakistanis have been released from Bagram in the past 10 months, China’s Xinhua Net reported last week, leaving reportedly just one Pakistani in US custody there. With regards to the total number of detainees held in Bagram, however, Donati acknowledged that such a statistic is not available.

“Almost nothing is known of the detainees' identities. The United States has declined to disclose their nationalities, where they were captured and how many are still in its custody,” she wrote, adding that the Justice Project Pakistan groups believes that some are from Yemen, Russia and Saudi Arabia and, if recent reports are accurate, amount to less than 50 individuals in custody.

Umbrella Men: Hong Kong’s #OccupyCentral goes viral & visual (PHOTOS)

RT -

Hong Kong’s weeklong student sit-in is turning into an “Umbrella Revolution” as Twitter has been deluged with a flood of protesters shielding themselves with umbrellas from clouds of teargas.

Even when teargas and pepper spray were cleared away, Occupy Central protesters participating in the sit-in kept their umbrellas open.

The umbrella trend caught on like wildfire, especially when it was learned that some 78 people were arrested, ranging from 16 to 58 years old.

Nice slice of life from #OccupyHongKong camp in Causeway Bay this afternoon. Photo by SCMP's Jonathan Wong pic.twitter.com/531eumP1cA

— Kristine Servando (@tinssoldier) September 29, 2014

But the violent confrontation did not deter the protesters, as tens of thousands again convened in central Hong Kong on Monday to rally for the right to elect their city’s executive by universal suffrage.

http://t.co/o1RlvSbfGG - #HKArtists supporting peaceful #OccupyHK demonstrators for #univeralsufferage. HK protestors are heroes #umbrell

— Tania Willis (@twillistration) September 29, 2014

HK protests now have a logo - it's the umbrella revolution. pic.twitter.com/J3B8BNCsJc

— angus grigg (@AngusGrigg) September 28, 2014

What is now being hailed as the “Umbrella Revolution” started as a student demonstration last week. The students were then supported by the Occupy Central movement and the protests grew massively.

Keep Calm and Carry an Umbrella @appledaily_hk @aiww @hu_jia @HuffingtonPost#UmbrellaMovement#OccupyCentralpic.twitter.com/3b2PuRuf6L

— HKDemoNow (@hkdemonow) September 29, 2014

Sunday’s pictures have gone viral online as the protest enters its second week and the second day since clashes with police.

I Can't Keep Calm coz the Movement has begun! @carolchan9394 @OCLPHK #occupycentral#Hk#UmbrellaMovementpic.twitter.com/tFstsy3Pyi

— HKDemoNow (@hkdemonow) September 29, 2014

Social media users have started hashtags that are trending all across the region.

Umbrella Men: Hong Kong’s #OccupyCentral goes viral & visual (PHOTOS)

RT -

The mass sit-in in central Hong Kong, calling for democratic reform, is now increasingly referred to as the “Umbrella Revolution” – both by media and by protesters themselves.

Why so? Numerous photos showing people shielding themselves with umbrellas from clouds of teargas and pepper spray, deployed by police indiscriminately to disperse crowds of protesters on Sunday have been spreading across the web like a firestorm.

One particular photo, dubbed the “Umbrella Man” may soon become the iconic image of the Occupy Central protest.

Organizers of the protest warned people to raise their hands in case of confrontation with the police, as a sign that they do not intend to attack.

Even when teargas and pepper spray were cleared away, Occupy Central protesters participating in the sit-in kept their umbrellas open.

Nice slice of life from #OccupyHongKong camp in Causeway Bay this afternoon. Photo by SCMP's Jonathan Wong pic.twitter.com/531eumP1cA

— Kristine Servando (@tinssoldier) September 29, 2014

An umbrella has inspired local designer and artists to come up with logos and banners for the “Umbrella movement.”

http://t.co/o1RlvSbfGG - #HKArtists supporting peaceful #OccupyHK demonstrators for #univeralsufferage. HK protestors are heroes #umbrell

— Tania Willis (@twillistration) September 29, 2014

HK protests now have a logo - it's the umbrella revolution. pic.twitter.com/J3B8BNCsJc

— angus grigg (@AngusGrigg) September 28, 2014

There is even a new version of the “Keep Calm and Carry On” banner that supporters of Occupy Central have edited to fit the situation.

Keep Calm and Carry an Umbrella @appledaily_hk @aiww @hu_jia @HuffingtonPost#UmbrellaMovement#OccupyCentralpic.twitter.com/3b2PuRuf6L

— HKDemoNow (@hkdemonow) September 29, 2014

And there is also another one, but with more of a revolutionary spirit.

I Can't Keep Calm coz the Movement has begun! @carolchan9394 @OCLPHK #occupycentral#Hk#UmbrellaMovementpic.twitter.com/tFstsy3Pyi

— HKDemoNow (@hkdemonow) September 29, 2014

These and many more pictures have gone viral online as the protest enters its second week and the second day since clashes with police.

Social media users have started hashtags that are trending all across the region.

Tens of thousands of people are protesting in Hong Kong for the right to elect their city’s executive by universal suffrage. It comes in response to Beijing’s ruling on Aug. 31 when it ordered that all candidates for the vote must first be approved by a government-loyal nominating committee.

What now is hailed as the “Umbrella Revolution” started as a student demonstration last week. They were then supported by the Occupy Central movement, making it a larger protest that tuned violent over the weekend.

Medical Records Worth More To Hackers Than Credit Cards

Slashdot -

HughPickens.com writes Reuters reports that your medical information including names, birth dates, policy numbers, diagnosis codes and billing information is worth 10 times more than your credit card number on the black market. Fraudsters use this data to create fake IDs to buy medical equipment or drugs that can be resold, or they combine a patient number with a false provider number and file made-up claims with insurers, according to experts who have investigated cyber attacks on healthcare organizations. Medical identity theft is often not immediately identified by a patient or their provider, giving criminals years to milk such credentials. That makes medical data more valuable than credit cards, which tend to be quickly canceled by banks once fraud is detected. Stolen health credentials can go for $10 each, about 10 or 20 times the value of a US credit card number says Don Jackson, director of threat intelligence at PhishLabs, a cyber crime protection company. He obtained the data by monitoring underground exchanges where hackers sell the information. Plus "healthcare providers and hospitals are just some of the easiest networks to break into," says Jeff Horne. "When I've looked at hospitals, and when I've talked to other people inside of a breach, they are using very old legacy systems — Windows systems that are 10 plus years old that have not seen a patch."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








RAF jets fly armed missions over Iraq – but bomb no ISIS targets

RT -

The Ministry of Defence in London confirmed that the missions carried out by Tornado GR-4 fighter bombers since they were given the green light to launch air strikes on IS targets in Iraq on Friday had ended with them returning to their airbase in Cyprus with their weapons still on board.

They explained that the Tornados had not hit ground targets because “no targets were identified as requiring immediate air attack by our aircraft.”

The RAF fighter jets are said to continue to fly armed reconnaissance missions over northern Iraq – in search of appropriate targets and to gather intelligence from the area.

In comparison, US and Arab jets have conducted at least seven airstrikes in Syria and three in northern Iraq, near the Kurdish capital, Erbil, against IS (also known as ISIS, or ISIL) as of this weekend.

The Pentagon said US airstrikes destroyed two IS checkpoints, a transport vehicle and an IS safe house in Iraq. US warplanes have also hit a command centre and oil production and refining sites in Syria that generate millions of dollars for the militants. Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates assisted with attacks in Syria over the weekend.

Michael Fallon, the UK Defence Secretary, warned this weekend that the RAF's mission – codenamed Operation Shader – could last years. “This is not a weekend campaign. We will see how it goes, but in the end [IS] have to be defeated in Syria,” he told the BBC. “This is going to take a long time.”

Fallon also said that 60 Britons returning to the UK from Syria and Iraq had been arrested on suspicion of fighting for IS.

Meanwhile, servicemen and women at the RAF base in Akrotiri, Cyprus, said they want to prevent other hostages facing the same fate as their former colleague David Haines, who worked as an RAF engineer for 12 years.

David Haines, 44, was beheaded in a video released by IS last month. IS’s second British hostage, Alan Henning, appeared at the end of the video and was threatened with execution.

An RAF source at Akrotiri told the Telegraph: “One of their [IS] victims was a former RAF serviceman, and it definitely feels a bit personal for all of us here. It’s not about revenge but perhaps some sort of justice – and certainly the hope that we can stop more people suffering the way David and other captives have.”

The fact that the RAF found no IS targets shows how much high-quality ground forces are needed, a former head of the UK armed services argued.

Lord Richards, who retired last year as chief of the general staff, told The Sunday Times that IS cannot be defeated by airstrikes alone and "boots on the ground" are needed.

“You can’t possibly defeat ISIS by only attacking them in Iraq,” Lord Richards said. “How the hell can you win the war when most of your enemy can end up in a country you can’t get involved in?"

“ISIS is not a terrorist organisation," he added. "It might commit acts of terror but it has tanks, artillery, huge wealth, courts, justice of its own kind, and is administering large areas, so the idea that this can be seen as a counterterrorism campaign is a key error."

Richards also warned that the US-led war against IS could “go on forever” unless a 100,000-strong army, consisting of Iraqi troops, Kurdish peshmerga militia and moderate Syrian rebels, was trained and deployed. He argues this army would have to be supported by British, US and other western advisers.

Prime Minister David Cameron, however, told the BBC: “What we are not having is some British invading army of combat troops on the ground.” Last week, MPs agreed to join a US-led airstrike campaign against IS – but only in Iraq. Cameron has said another parliamentary vote would be needed to attack IS targets in Syria.

RAF jets fly armed missions over Iraq – but bomb no ISIS targets

RT -

The Ministry of Defence in London confirmed that the missions carried out by Tornado GR-4 fighter bombers since they were given the green light to launch air strikes on IS targets in Iraq on Friday had ended with them returning to their airbase in Cyprus with their weapons still on board.

They explained that the Tornados had not hit ground targets because “no targets were identified as requiring immediate air attack by our aircraft.”

The RAF fighter jets are said to continue to fly armed reconnaissance missions over northern Iraq – in search of appropriate targets and to gather intelligence from the area.

In comparison, US and Arab jets have conducted at least seven airstrikes in Syria and three in northern Iraq, near the Kurdish capital, Erbil, against IS (also known as ISIS, or ISIL) as of this weekend.

The Pentagon said US airstrikes destroyed two IS checkpoints, a transport vehicle and an IS safe house in Iraq. US warplanes have also hit a command centre and oil production and refining sites in Syria that generate millions of dollars for the militants. Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates assisted with attacks in Syria over the weekend.

Michael Fallon, the UK Defence Secretary, warned this weekend that the RAF's mission – codenamed Operation Shader – could last years. “This is not a weekend campaign. We will see how it goes, but in the end [IS] have to be defeated in Syria,” he told the BBC. “This is going to take a long time.”

Fallon also said that 60 Britons returning to the UK from Syria and Iraq had been arrested on suspicion of fighting for IS.

Meanwhile, servicemen and women at the RAF base in Akrotiri, Cyprus, said they want to prevent other hostages facing the same fate as their former colleague David Haines, who worked as an RAF engineer for 12 years.

David Haines, 44, was beheaded in a video released by IS last month. IS’s second British hostage, Alan Henning, appeared at the end of the video and was threatened with execution.

An RAF source at Akrotiri told the Telegraph: “One of their [IS] victims was a former RAF serviceman, and it definitely feels a bit personal for all of us here. It’s not about revenge but perhaps some sort of justice – and certainly the hope that we can stop more people suffering the way David and other captives have.”

The fact that the RAF found no IS targets shows how much high-quality ground forces are needed, a former head of the UK armed services argued.

Lord Richards, who retired last year as chief of the general staff, told The Sunday Times that IS cannot be defeated by airstrikes alone and "boots on the ground" are needed.

“You can’t possibly defeat ISIS by only attacking them in Iraq,” Lord Richards said. “How the hell can you win the war when most of your enemy can end up in a country you can’t get involved in?"

“ISIS is not a terrorist organisation," he added. "It might commit acts of terror but it has tanks, artillery, huge wealth, courts, justice of its own kind, and is administering large areas, so the idea that this can be seen as a counterterrorism campaign is a key error."

Richards also warned that the US-led war against IS could “go on forever” unless a 100,000-strong army, consisting of Iraqi troops, Kurdish peshmerga militia and moderate Syrian rebels, was trained and deployed. He argues this army would have to be supported by British, US and other western advisers.

Prime Minister David Cameron, however, told the BBC: “What we are not having is some British invading army of combat troops on the ground.” Last week, MPs agreed to join a US-led airstrike campaign against IS – but only in Iraq. Cameron has said another parliamentary vote would be needed to attack IS targets in Syria.

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