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Here’s to the Crazy Ones – of Bitcoin

Bitcoin Magazine -

Apple computer’s return from ashes in 1997 began in the public’s mind with one wildly successful ad campaign: “Think Different”.

The story for how the ad campaign came together can be found on forbes.com. Back then, the hemorrhaging Apple Computer Corporation desperately hired back Steve Jobs, who led the company back from the ashes in spectacular fashion. The Apple PCs were then perceived as toys. Yet he established them as a counter-culture revolution. To be taken seriously by business and the public, it needed respect. It needed to show to the world how it was…different. It was an alternative.

Today, Apple is as mainstream as apple pie. They are now the fifth biggest company listed in The Fortune 500.  How long can you say you’re different when everybody else tries to be you? Is it possible for a company to continue to claim to ‘think different” when they are constantly being imitated? Think differently from who? Apple managed to climb all the way back up to the top of its industry and recent estimates indicate it has over 160 billion dollars cash on hand; the reserve is larger than many nations‘. This was all before lines began forming for the latest iPhone release.

The “Think Different” campaign is timeless. The poetic and timeless words were fitting for a company still on the edge of being regarded as a historical footnote.

Bitcoin is not a company, it’s a technology. Many of its initial fans formed into a spontaneous naturally occurring counter-culture movement rather than one being artificially designed by an advertising agency as part of a re-branding effort. Bitcoin has no expensive advertising campaign or budget. Its own culture started in true life back streets and basements of the world – not boardrooms and advertising pitches. The total market capitalization of bitcoin is currently less than 3% of just the available cash on hand at Apple.

In the “Think Different” advertisements, we see black and white images from some of history’s most brilliant people who became the literal poster boys of those that thought differently. Today, placing Steve Jobs on that list would likely not find much resistance. The spirit and achievements of this group have become legendary… and will live on long from now.

We pay homage to this great ad campaign and the spirit of rebellious respect it gives to the past “crazy ones”. Following the original spirit of the creators of the award winning advertising concept, we’ve recreated the message below but with a twist. Today, it seems to be more fitting that a true counter-culture movement be used. Today’s bitcoin leaders (with some creative license) that push forward the latest technology.

Here now are some of the celebrated  “crazy” bitcoin geniuses that have helped get bitcoin this far.

The post Here’s to the Crazy Ones – of Bitcoin appeared first on Bitcoin Magazine.

Studies Conclude Hands-Free-calling and Apple Siri Distract Drivers

Slashdot -

New submitter operator_error writes with a story at the L.A. Times that echoes some previous research on the relative risks of hand-held vs. hands-free phones by drivers, and comes to an even grimmer conclusion: In many cars, making a hands-free phone call can be more distracting than picking up your phone, according to a new study from AAA and the University of Utah. In-dash phone systems are overly complicated and prone to errors, the study found, and the same is true for voice-activated functions for music and navigation. A companion study also found that trying to use Siri — the voice control system on Apple phones — while driving was dangerously distracting. Two participants in the study had virtual crashes in an automotive simulator while attempting to use Siri, the study's authors reported. In response, Toyota said the study did not show a link between cognitive distraction and car crashes. "The results actually tell us very little about the relative benefits of in-vehicle versus hand-held systems; or about the relationship between cognitive load and crash risks," said Mike Michels, a Toyota spokesman. Meanwhile, many states treat hand-held devices very differently from hands-free ones; in New York, for instance, both texting and talking on a hand-held mobile phone are put in the same category, while talking on a hands-free device is covered only by more general distracted driving laws. If the Utah study is correct, maybe that's backwards. (And some evidence suggests that phone use in cars is not quite the straightforward danger that it's sometimes presented as, despite the correlation of phone use with accidents.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ebola spread 'unavoidable' in Europe due to extensive travel - WTO

RT -

Such imported cases and similar events as have happened in Spain will happen also in the future, most likely,” the WHO European director Zsuzsanna Jakab told Reuters.

On Monday scientists predicted that there was a 75 percent chance that Ebola would reach France by the end October and a 50 percent chance for the UK.

The most dangerous contributor to the spread is the behavior of the virus. Its symptoms catch people unawares and normally follow a 21-day incubation period, during which there’s literally no visible sign the person has contracted Ebola.

This is further complicated by the EU’s free movement system – one can literally infect anyone they come into contact with in the space of a few days if they were to drive or fly from one country to another.

It is quite unavoidable ... that such incidents will happen in the future because of the extensive travel both from Europe to the affected countries and the other way around,” Jakab said.

WHO has so far placed no restrictions on flights to the worst-affected countries. While British Airways and Emirates are no longer flying there, Air France has only suspended flights to Sierra Leone – not Liberia, Guinea or Nigeria (though air crews were recently offered the option to refuse flying to those destinations).

Additionally, patients who have contacted the disease in West Africa have been repatriated for treatment – such as the two missionaries who died in Septamber in Spain – one of whom infected the 44-year-old Spanish nurse who was diagnosed on Monday.

However, WHO has stated that the continent is well prepared to control the disease.

It will happen," she said. "But the most important thing in our view is that Europe is still at low risk and that the western part of the European region particularly is the best prepared in the world to respond to viral haemorrhagic fevers including Ebola,” Jakab said.

EBOLA SPREAD: RT'S INTERACTIVE MAP

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MatchStick Firefox OS media streaming software ported to other ARM TV sticks

Liliputing -

MatchStick is a small, inexpensive device you can plug into a TV to stream internet video or other content. It’s a lot like Google’s Chromecast, but it’s expected o sell for $10 less. More importantly, it runs open source software based on Mozilla’s Firefox OS instead of Google’s Chrome software. The team behind the MatchStick […]

MatchStick Firefox OS media streaming software ported to other ARM TV sticks is a post from: Liliputing

The myth of Assad, ISIL and extremism

RT -

It is difficult to find US officials directly claiming that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is in league with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), but you will find plenty who will allude to it using specious reasoning:

US Secretary of State John Kerry is one of many who have sought to encourage this narrative:

“There is evidence that Assad has played footsie with them (ISIL), and he has used them as a tool of weakening the opposition. He never took on their headquarters, which were there and obvious, and other assets that they have. So we have no confidence that Assad is either capable of or willing to take on ISIL.”
That logic forms the basis of several key arguments used by Syria’s opponents to suggest a covert and symbiotic relationship between the Syrian government and Islamist extremists. They go something like this:

• Assad encouraged the growth of militants to create an either-or dilemma for Syrians who want him deposed, but who fear “what comes next.”

• Assad released militants from prison in 2011 so that they would overwhelm secular moderates.
• Proof of this is that the Syrian Army does not attack ISIL targets.

• Assad has a close history with militants – he sent hundreds over the border into Iraq to join the insurgency against US forces and is now suffering blowback.

But as a global confrontation with ISIL mounts, an entirely different picture has begun to emerge. The US-led coalition's five Arab Sunni partners are providing little less than fig-leaf cover for airstrike operations. NATO has been unable to wrest - to date - a commitment from Turkey to enforce serious border security to stop militants from crossing over into Iraq and Syria. In recent weeks, Western media has unleashed a flurry of articles pointing to Qatar's role in funding extremists.

Clearly, America's Sunni Arab and Turkish allies are approaching the “ISIL Project”' with something less than enthusiasm.

On Thursday, US Vice President Joe Biden let the cat out of the bag. During a speech at Harvard University, Biden told his audience:

"Our allies in the region were our largest problem in Syria. The Turks...the Saudis, the Emiratis, etc. What were they doing? They were so determined to take down Assad and essentially have a proxy Sunni-Shia war, what did they do? They poured hundreds of millions of dollars and tens, thousands of tons of weapons into anyone who would fight against Assad except that the people who were being supplied were al Nusra and al Qaeda and the extremist elements of jihadis coming from other parts of the world….we could not convince our colleagues to stop supplying them."

He, of course, failed to mention Washington's own arming, training and funding activities coordinated with these very same allies. Predictably, Biden was forced to “apologize” for his undiplomatic comments over the weekend.

But just last month, during a hearing in the US Senate for Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey, Senator Lindsey Graham asked: “Do you know of any major Arab ally that embraces ISIL?”

To the surprise of many, Dempsey countered: “I know of major Arab allies who fund them.”

The revelations keep flowing from once tight-lipped Western sources. According to US news reports, current and former officials now say wealthy Gulf donors are the source of early funding:

“These rich individuals have long served as ‘angel investors’ for the most violent militants in the region, providing the ‘seed money’ that helped launch ISIS and other jihadi groups…Former U.S. Navy Admiral and NATO Supreme Commander James Stavridis says the cash flow from private donors is significant now and was even more significant in the early fund-raising done by ISIS and al Qaeda’s affiliate in Syria, the al-Nusra Front,” NBC’s Robert Windrem wrote in an article.

And on Saturday, the UK's former Assistant Chief of the Defense Staff General Jonathan Shaw, who specialized in counter-terrorism and security policy and retired in 2012, told The Telegraph:
"This is a time bomb that, under the guise of education, Wahhabi Salafism is igniting under the world really. And it is funded by Saudi and Qatari money and that must stop."

The ‘Assad-has-encouraged-extremism’ argument

Has the Syrian government exploited extremism while at the same time fighting a three-year nationwide military campaign to thwart it? Perhaps. Politics are opportunistic by nature.

But the narrative about Assad encouraging Islamist militancy has always failed to note the historic role of armed Islamists in Syrian “rebellions.”

A US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) document that was declassified in 2012 provides a starkly different reading of events leading up to the controversial “Hama massacre” of 1982. It tells a story remarkably similar to events in Syria beginning in early 2011. Here is a montage of quotes from the document:

“In early 1979, encouraged by the Islamic Revolution in Iran, the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood developed a plan to trigger a similar popular revolution in Syria to oust (Hafez) Assad. The massacre of 50 Alawite cadets, on 16 June 1979 at the Artillery School in Aleppo, signaled the start of the MB offensive.”

The Syrian MB regroups for a “new round of fighting” in late 1980, announces the formation of an “Islamic Front”’ and increases cooperation with the Sunni (Baathist) government of Iraq which had helped the MB covertly in 1979-80 to oust Assad.

“The plan, apparently developed by the leadership of the Syrian MB and probably coordinated with Iraq, centered on two complementary actions. The first was a full-scale revolt by the city of Hama, a traditional Brotherhood stronghold and the location of its covert headquarters in Syria. Once this rebellion was unleashed, similar uprisings were to take place in Aleppo, Damascus and other major cities, accompanied by a general strike designed to paralyze Syria...”

“Simultaneously, a sophisticated worldwide propaganda campaign was to be launched supporting the rebellion and emphasizing its victories and the wholesale desertion of Army units to the rebel side. Press releases were to be made in Europe and the US, while propaganda broadcasts against Syria were to be carried by the Phalange-controlled Voice of Lebanon and the Iraqi-controlled Voice of Arab Syria.”

“At least 100 militants were transported from Jordan, where they had taken refuge, into Iraq where they probably received training prior to their movement into Syria... Sometime after this, the infiltration of ‘Secret Apparatus’ militants began from staging areas in Iraq, and to a lesser degree from Turkey, where others had fled. During the interim period, a number of terrorist bombings and shootings took place in Syria to demonstrate the Brotherhood/dissident Alawites ability to strike at the government.”

“As a result of Syrian security actions, the MB was forced to prematurely unleash the Hama rebellion with the hope that it might spark widespread fighting in other cities…The rebellion would also force the Damascus government to become even more oppressive. The Brotherhood leadership believed this would, in turn, cause greater alienation of the Assad government from the Sunni Muslim majority and within the Alawite community.”

“On February 2, following a clash between the MB and Syrian security forces, the loudspeakers atop the mosque minarets in Hama called on the people to begin a Jihad (Holy Struggle) against the government. The appeal also told the people that arms were available at specified mosques. At about the same time, teams of the MB’s ‘Secret Apparatus,’ some in army uniforms, moved to attack preselected government targets in the city.”

“Despite the propaganda reporting, the uprising in Syria had never spread outside of Hama, although some limited bombings had taken place in Damascus and elsewhere… The total casualties for the Hama incident probably number about 2,000. This includes an estimated 300-400 of the Muslim Brotherhood’s elite ‘Secret Apparatus’… The Syrian dissidents’ modus operandi will continue to be terrorism, particularly bombings and assassinations.”

WikiLeaks: Syria’s government and terrorism

On February 24, 2010, a Cable classified as ‘Secret’ was dispatched from the US Embassy in Damascus to the CIA, DIA, National Security Council, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Office of Homeland Security and a smattering of key US embassies in the Middle East and Europe.

It details the communications between Syria’s General Intelligence Director (GID) Ali Mamlouk who dropped in on a meeting between Syria’s Vice Foreign Minister Faisal al-Miqdad and a US delegation, headed by State Department Coordinator for Counterterrorism Daniel Benjamin.

The participants discuss possible future security and intelligence cooperation on issues related to terrorism, particularly on the Syria-Iraq border.

What is notable about this US-framed communiqué is that the American delegation does not take any of the Syrian officials in the room to task for “encouraging and coordinating” the passage of extremist fighters from Syria into Iraq to participate in an insurgency against US forces. This accusation has become a key narrative advanced by Washington in recent years, so why not challenge the Syrians face-to-face when the opportunity is there?

According to the Cable, Benjamin says “the two countries should still work to cooperate on immediate threats facing both the U.S. and Syria, including the proliferation of takfiri groups in the region, such as al-Qaeda, and stopping the flow of foreign fighters into Iraq.”

The Syrian response? According to the US Cable:

“Mamlouk said the foreign fighters come from a large number of Arab and Muslim countries and that the Syrians detain ‘large numbers plus their local facilitators.’ As an example, Mamlouk said he handed over 23 Saudis detained in Syria to Saudi Prince Muqrin last year.”

The US delegation even acknowledges the fact that the Syrians have been helpful:

“Benjamin commended Mamlouk on reducing the flow of foreign fighters, while encouraging further progress.”

And the Syrians offer additional cooperation, provided that Damascus takes the lead in these efforts:

“Miqdad interjected that the issue of foreign fighters using Syrian soil is a matter of national security for Syria. ‘We have zero tolerance,’ he said. Miqdad said Syria needs the cooperation of other countries, namely those from which the terrorists are coming. ‘If we can close this circle - with us, you, and other countries - we will succeed,’ he concluded.”

The Cable does reveal some interesting information about Syrian strategies in dealing with terrorism, which Mamlouk says differs considerably from the American approach:

"The GID Director said Syria had been more successful than the U.S. and other countries in the region in fighting terrorist groups because ‘we are practical and not theoretical.’ He stated Syria's success is due to its penetration of terrorist groups. ‘In principle, we don't attack or kill them immediately. Instead, we embed ourselves in them and only at the opportune moment do we move.’ Describing the process of planting embeds in terrorist organizations as ‘complex,’ Mamlouk said the result had yielded been the detention of scores of terrorists, stamping out terror cells, and stopping hundreds of terrorists from entering Iraq.

Mamlouk acknowledged some terrorists were still slipping into Iraq from Syria. ‘By all means we will continue to do all this, but if we start cooperation with you it will lead to better results and we can better protect our interests,’ he concluded.”

War of words

The tactics described by Mamlouk explain, in part, why Syrian forces today do not typically launch assaults on terrorist groups unless there is an immediate and direct threat to its military strategy of maintaining control over key areas and disrupting rebel supply lines.

While groups like ISIL are viewed as a security threat, they have not always posed an imminent one.

For the better part of the Syrian conflict, ISIL has not controlled the “priority zones” of the Syrian Army.

Those areas have always been Damascus, Aleppo, Homs, Hama and their surrounding countryside (Rif), with Quseir and Qalamoun, Daraa, Tal Kalakh and other border towns playing an important role. When ISIL fighters have been present in those areas, the Syrian Army has fought them - as in Qalamoun and the Damascus suburbs.

In early 2014, pro-opposition writer and researcher A.J. Tamimi questioned in detail accusations of collaboration between the Syrian government and ISIL/al Nusra. Among his many points, Tamimi notes:

“One must ask what the regime would gain strategically by constantly bombing ISIS strongholds in Raqqa province, or ISIS strongholds elsewhere, for that matter, located far beyond the frontlines. As in the wider east of Syria, the regime lacks ground forces to launch an offensive to retake any territory in Raqqa province, and must depend on airlifts from elsewhere to maintain its remaining airbases. Hence, the regime is focusing its airstrikes where it has some real expectations of advancing: most notably in Aleppo city.”

Nevertheless, the Syrian air force did take immediate action when ISIL escalated in Mosul in June, which changed the geopolitical dynamic well beyond the Syrian-Iraqi border. Kerry is misleading when he suggests that Assad will not strike ISIL headquarters: this is about timing and gains from both a military and political perspective – not necessarily a response that trigger-happy Americans can understand.

As for accusations that the Syrians have released militants from their prisons to “populate” ideologically extremist rebel groups that will make Assad look like an angel… You can’t have it both ways – political prisoner releases were initiated to defuse conflict and demonstrate leniency. Were some of these prisoners “extremists” of the variety that man Islamist rebel groups? Almost certainly. But that was the Sunni constituency that the Syrian government was also trying to placate in the early days.

Even today, after grueling “reconciliation” negotiations, the Syrian government is allowing these very rebels to “go free” after they lay down their arms – this, according to volunteers involved in negotiations from Homs to Rif Damascus. What is to stop these same “reformed rebels” from hopping over to al-Raqqa and taking up bigger arms? Should the Syrian government kill them instead? How does one win in a situation like this?

Critics of Syria's prisoner releases should be reminded of the “Big One” carried out by the Americans in 2009 when they allegedly freed future ISIL ‘Caliph’ Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi from an Iraqi prison.

Does anyone have the right to point fingers after that monumental gaff? The fact is – from Saudi Arabia to Qatar, from Turkey to the United States, from Iraq to France – there appears to be plenty of complicity in fueling ISIL and the jihadi phenomenon. Is Syria complicit too? It depends who is asking - and why.

Fighting ISIS: $1.1bn already spent, ‘30 years of war’ to come

RT -

Since mid-June, when militants from the Islamic State (also known as ISIS, or ISIL) launched their lightning offensive in Iraq, the Pentagon has spent $1.1 billion on fighting the militia, US Central Command reported Monday.

The US Navy has spent $62 million on about 185 warheads, including 47 Tomahawk cruise missiles.

The US Air Force has spent far more on munitions, dropping some 1,000 smart bombs and rockets during its sorties, AP reported CentCom as saying.

Officials say the campaign has cost an average of $7 million to $10 million a day since June. The cost escalated after the US started bombing IS positions in Iraq in early August and then expanded to Syria in September.

The report confirmed an estimate by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA), a Washington-based think tank with ties to the Pentagon, which said a week ago that the campaign against ISIS had probably already cost between $780 and $930 million.

READ: Nearly $1bn already spent on US military campaign against ISIS

The US military spending, supported by a coalition of some 40 nations, doesn’t appear to have stopped IS from scoring new victories. Its fighters have been advancing in the battle for the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani overnight, with two IS flags still visible over the eastern side of the town, Reuters reported.

The fight against IS may take quite a long time, according former Pentagon chief Leon Panetta, who said “we're looking at kind of a 30-year war" in an interview with USA Today.

“It’s going to take a long time to go after these elements,” he said.

Panetta, whose memoir, “Worthy Fights,” is about to hit bookstores, criticizes President Barack Obama in the book for rushing the Iraq withdrawal in 2011. The decision was based on the assumption that Iraq’s own US-trained army and security forces would be able to provide security in the country. But in reality, Iraq slid into a violent quagmire that culminated with a surprise insurgent offensive that Baghdad’s troops did little to prevent.

Rebel sell: H&M apologizes for Kurdish female fighter-inspired jumpsuit

RT -

Going on sale for roughly $24, the loose-fitting, olive green khaki jumpsuit appears cut from military surplus cloth.

Dozens of social media users made a comparison between similarly loose-fitting military attire worn by women serving in Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG), who have stood shoulder-to-shoulder with Kurdish Peshmerga fighters in a fierce struggle against so-called Islamic State (IS) fighters in Syria and Iraq.

Kristofer Lundberg accused H&M of indirect war profiteering.

“It’s terrible that H&M use the ISIS war against Kurds to make money,” he wrote on Facebook.

H&M have a Peshmerga inspired jumpsuit. FFS. pic.twitter.com/3JRVnOqEpa

— Miنi (@miniestmini) October 7, 2014

Amir M. Mashour criticized H&M for being shallow, saying the firm should be "inspired by [Kurdish women’s] bravery & sacrifices” rather than their clothes.”

Once debate ensued on whether H&M should apologize for the alleged faux pas, the Swedish multinational decided to cut the controversy off at the pass, and published an apology.

“We are truly sorry if we have offended anyone with this piece, this was of course never our intention,” H&M's global press officer, Ida Stahlnacke, said in a statement. “At H&M we want to offer the latest within fashion and trends and we continuously listen to our customers’ requests.”

Stahlnacke noted that the expansion of the jumpsuit range was due to popular demand, with denim blue and deep red all being rolled out alongside the olive option.

H&M, instead of being inspired by #Kurdish women #Peshmarga's clothes, be inspired by their bravery & sacrifices. #TwitterKurds#stereotypes

— Amir M. Ashour (@AmirLemina) October 6, 2014

She added that khaki green is, incidentally, “one of the trendiest colors this season.”

Not everyone, however, has been offended by the resemblance H&M’s outfit to Kurdish kit.

Neferpitou, an Iraqi Christian Twitter user, saw the H&M jumpsuit as a way of paying homage to the brave Kurdish fighters.

“You go girls, so proud!” she wrote.

@K4life_: H&M have been inspired by the Kurdish female fighters. pic.twitter.com/3yLwqB3th9” YOU GO GIRLS SO PROUD

— Neferpitou (@Lizaabuhanna) October 5, 2014

Self-described former diplomat Azos L. Rashad used the H&M controversy to take a swipe at US-led efforts to neutralize IS with airstrikes.

In the last 24 hours H&M have done more for the Kurdish cause with their women's Peshmerga fashion line than all of #NATO put together

— Azos L. Rashid (@AzosLRashid) October 6, 2014

Hedy Brime, meanwhile, joined the social media chorus of those asking H&M to join the pro-Kurdish cause.

“I'm Kurdish and I'm glad to see the Kurdish female fighters outfit on sale. It will introduce our culture to the world, however, I know it's war time for us and I hope some of the money that H&M makes goes to the homeless people of Kurdistan who left their home to seek… safety!” she wrote.

Kurdish female fighters have been lionized in the West, standing out in sharp relief to the medieval attitude towards women demonstrated by Islamic State.

Their penchant for intense resistance, often to the bitter end, has only increased their mystique.

On Sunday, a 19-year-old Kurdish fighter named Ceylan Ozalp found herself surrounded by IS militants in the Syrian Kurdish city of Kobani.

After she run out of ammunition, Ozalp said “Goodbye” over her radio and spent her last bullet on killing herself.

In a related story on Sunday, a female Peshmerga fighter carried out a suicide attack against IS militants in a desperate bit to hold onto the strategically important town.

The most beautiful girl I've ever seen. #CeylanOzalp: the 19 year old Kurdish girl who is fighting #ISIS in #Kobanepic.twitter.com/nkZOVvHFHa

— تمارا Tamara (@_Syriana_) October 5, 2014

In a related story on Sunday, a female Peshmerga fighter carried out a suicide attack against IS militants in a desperate bid to hold onto the strategically important town.

Michigan Builds Driverless Town For Testing Autonomous Cars

Slashdot -

HughPickens.com writes Highway driving, which is less complex than city driving, has proved easy enough for self-driving cars, but busy downtown streets—where cars and pedestrians jockey for space and behave in confusing and surprising ways—are more problematic. Now Will Knight reports that Michigan's Department of Transportation and 13 companies involved with developing automated driving technology are constructing a 30-acre, $6.5 million driverless town near Ann Arbor to test self-driving cars in an urban environment. Complex intersections, confusing lane markings, and busy construction crews will be used to gauge the aptitude of the latest automotive sensors and driving algorithms and mechanical pedestrians will even leap into the road from between parked cars so researchers can see if they trip up onboard safety systems. "I think it's a great idea," says John Leonard, a professor at MIT who led the development of a self-driving vehicle for a challenge run by DARPA in 2007. "It is important for us to try to collect statistically meaningful data about the performance of self-driving cars. Repeated operations—even in a small-scale environment—can yield valuable data sets for testing and evaluating new algorithms." The testing facility is part of broader work by the University of Michigan's Mobility Transformation Facility that will include putting up to 20,000 vehicles on southeastern Michigan roads. By 2021, Ann Arbor could become the first American city with a shared fleet of networked, driverless vehicles. "Ann Arbor will be seen as the leader in 21st century mobility," says Peter Sweatman, director of the U-M Transportation Research Institute. "We want to demonstrate fully driverless vehicles operating within the whole infrastructure of the city within an eight-year timeline and to show that these can be safe, effective and commercially successful."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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