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Installing Lighttpd with PHP 7 (PHP-FPM) and MySQL 5.7 on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

HowtoForge - Linux Howtos and Tutorials -

Lighttpd is a secure, fast, standards-compliant web server designed for speed-critical environments. This tutorial shows how you can install Lighttpd on an Ubuntu 16.04 server with PHP 7 support (through PHP-FPM) and MySQL 5.7. PHP-FPM (FastCGI Process Manager) is an alternative PHP FastCGI implementation with some additional features useful for sites of any size, especially busier sites. I use PHP-FPM in this tutorial instead of Lighttpd's spawn-fcgi.

Why old statues have tiny penises

Boing Boing -

There's an obvious answer to the smallness of statues' penises: the manners and religious prudishness of classical elites. But the issue is more about differing standards of beauty and modern mens' penis anxiety, writes Ellen Oredsson. Which is to say that smaller penises were once regarded as ideal, and many real penises aren't any bigger than the ones on the statues.

...small penises were more culturally valued is that large penises were associated with very specific characteristics: foolishness, lust and ugliness. There are actually quite a few ancient Greek sculptures that have enormous penises. Here’s one:

Small dicks are, then, associated with reason and logic. The argument gets strained when applied to the western renaissance, where imitation and idealism intersect more sharply with religious sentiment.

Build your own Raspberry Pi terrarium controller

Raspberry Pi -

Tom Bennet grows Nepenthes, tropical carnivorous plants that I know by the name of pitcher plants. To stay healthy they need a temperature- and humidity-controlled environment, and Tom ensures this by housing them in a terrarium controlled by a Raspberry Pi 3 and Energenie’s Pi-Mote starter kit, which provides an easy way to control mains electrical sockets from a Pi. He has written step-by-step instructions to help you build your own terrarium controller, the first such guide we’ve seen for this particular application.

Nepenthes plants of various species in Tom Bennet’s Pi-controlled terrarium. Photo by Tom Bennet

Tom’s terrarium controller doesn’t only monitor and regulate temperature, humidity and light, three of the four main variables in a terrarium (the fourth, he explains, is water, and because terrariums tend to be nearly or completely sealed, this requires only infrequent intervention). It also logs data from its sensors to Internet-of-Things data platform ThingSpeak, which offers real-time data visualisation and alerts.

24 hours’ worth of temperature and humidity data for Tom’s terrarium

One of the appealing aspects of this project, as Tom observes, is its capacity for extension. You could quite easily add a soil moisture sensor or, particularly for a terrarium that houses reptiles rather than plants, a camera module, as well as using the online data logs in all kinds of ways.

The very clear instructions include a full and costed bill of materials consisting of off-the-shelf parts that come to less than £90/$125 including the Pi. There are helpful photographs and wiring diagrams, straightforward explanations, practical advice, and Python scripts that can easily be adapted to meet the demands of different habitats and ambient conditions. Thank you for writing such a useful guide, Tom; we’re certain it will help plenty of other people set up their own Pi-controlled terrariums!

The post Build your own Raspberry Pi terrarium controller appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

This Unusual Botnet Targets Scientists, Engineers, and Academics

Slashdot -

schwit1 quotes a report from ZDNet: A botnet and cyberattack campaign is infecting victims across the globe and appears to be tracking the actions of specially selected targets in sectors ranging from government to engineering. Researchers from Forcepoint Security Labs have warned that the campaign it has dubbed 'Jaku' -- after a planet in the Star Wars universe because of references to the sci-fi saga in the malware code -- is different to and more sophisticated than many botnet campaigns. Rather than indiscriminately infecting victims, this campaign is capable of performing "a separate, highly targeted operation" used to monitor members of international non-governmental organizations, engineering companies, academics, scientists and government employees, the researchers said. The findings are set out in Forcepoint's report on Jaku, which outlines how of the estimated 19,000 unique victims, 42 percent are in South Korea and a further 31 percent in Japan. Both are countries and neighbors of North Korea. A further nine percent of Jaku victims are in China, six percent in the US, with the remainder spread across 130 other countries.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Honey, I shrunk the BeagleBone Black!

LXer -

Octavo Systems has packed nearly all the functions of a BeagleBone Black SBC into a BGA package that only requires a few external components to boot Linux. Much excitement has been generated in recent months by the introduction of a series of ever-smaller, low-cost single board computers. A few of these have included Inforce’s 85 […]

Why identifying Satoshi Nakamoto is important

Boing Boing -

Craig Wright's latest effort to prove himself the creator of bitcoin ended in farce, but some commentators are tired of the whole saga, saying that it doesn't matter who invented Bitcoin because its decentralized nature renders the creator irrelevant. Adrian Chen disagrees: "the idea that Nakamoto’s identity is irrelevant is wishful thinking."

Most obviously, Nakamoto’s identity matters because he is estimated to control four hundred and forty-eight million dollars’ worth of bitcoin, which, if it were unloaded quickly, could seriously depress the value of the notoriously volatile currency.

The real Nakamoto could have a more fundamental impact as well: as The Economist pointed out, this latest saga unfolded during a heated “civil war” that has broken out among bitcoin developers over how to deal with an increase in transaction volume in the bitcoin network. The network processes transactions in batches known as “blocks.” As the number of blocks has increased, the network has become in danger of being overloaded. One side in the dispute wants to change the bitcoin code, increasing the block size to allow the system to process transactions more quickly. The other side sees this as a betrayal of the integrity of the original code, arguing that a change would lead to more centralization in the system (the greatest sin for a bitcoin believer) and consequent problems.

Vanity's murky pond, inch-deep yet thick as tar.

Democracy Now! 2016-05-10 Tuesday

Democracy Now! BitTorrents -

Headlines for May 10, 2016; Ralph Nader: Sanders Should Stay in Democratic Race, Is Only Losing Due to Anti-Democratic System; Nader: TV Networks Give Trump a "Free Ride" on Public Airwaves & Cash In on the Election; Nader: The U.S. Political & Media System Is Designed to Obstruct, Silence Third-Party Candidates; Glenn Greenwald on Brazil: Goal of Rousseff Impeachment is to Boost Neoliberals & Protect Corruption

Democracy Now! 2016-05-10 Tuesday

Democracy Now! Videos -

Democracy Now! 2016-05-10 Tuesday
  • Headlines for May 10, 2016
  • Ralph Nader: Sanders Should Stay in Democratic Race, Is Only Losing Due to Anti-Democratic System
  • Nader: TV Networks Give Trump a "Free Ride" on Public Airwaves & Cash In on the Election
  • Nader: The U.S. Political & Media System Is Designed to Obstruct, Silence Third-Party Candidates
  • Glenn Greenwald on Brazil: Goal of Rousseff Impeachment is to Boost Neoliberals & Protect Corruption

Download this show

Hacker Arrested after Exposing Flaws in Elections Site

The Hacker News -

A security researcher disclosed vulnerabilities in the poorly secured web domains of a Florida county elections, but he ended up in handcuffs on criminal hacking charges and jailed for six hours Wednesday. Security researcher David Michael Levin was arrested and charged by the United States law enforcement after breaking into and disclosing some serious vulnerabilities in a couple of

FCC takes initiative to Speed Up Mobile Security Updates

The Hacker News -

In Brief The Smartphone users are fed up with slow security updates, so two United States federal agencies have launched an official inquiry to know how manufacturers and carriers deal with mobile phone security updates and what they are doing to roll out patches as quickly as possible. The Smartphone patch update mechanism is broken, and someone has to fix it. Most smartphone models are

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