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Sony To Offer Partial Refunds For PS Vita

Slashdot -

mpicpp sends this report from the Houston Chronicle: "Hundreds of thousands of people who bought the handheld gaming console PlayStation Vita are in line for a partial refund from Sony because of questionable claims in its advertising. The Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday it had reached a settlement with Sony Computer Entertainment America, the U.S.-based arm of the PlayStation business, over advertising claims that the government contended were misleading. As part of the proposed settlement, Sony will provide refunds to those who bought the PS Vita console before June 1, 2012. They'll be eligible for either a $25 cash or credit refund — or a $50 merchandise voucher from Sony. ... Among the claims challenged by the FTC: That the pocket-sized console would revolutionize gaming mobility by allowing consumers to play their PlayStation 3 games via "remote play" on the console anywhere with a Wi-Fi connection, [and] that people could engage in "cross-platform" play by starting a game on a PlayStation 3, pausing it, and continuing the game with the PS Vita from where they left off. Not really true, the FTC said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Counter-terror bill published, slammed by civil liberty groups

RT -

Home Secretary Theresa May outlined the nine principal elements of the bill, which is the seventh major counter-terror law introduced in Britain since 9/11. However, there have been concerns over a number of proposals, as suspects could use loopholes to avoid the measures.

The bill is aimed at tackling the growing threat posed by Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) which, according to May, have given “energy and a renewed sense of purpose to subversive Islamist organizations and radical leaders” in Britain. She added that the UK faces a greater terror threat than ever before.

One measure introduced is to ban British citizens who have traveled abroad to fight for terrorist groups from reentering the UK. For this, the government outlines cancelation of travel documents, including suspects’ details on British border 'watch lists' and no-fly lists.

“So the message to British nationals participating in terrorism overseas is clear: you will only be allowed to come home on our terms,” May said.

However, legal concerns have arisen from this proposal, as the measure includes a plan to make the individual choose between coming home to Britain and put under monitoring by security services or being banned from the UK for up to two years, even though they will in effect be left stateless.

There are also concerns of possible loopholes that could be used to avoid this measure, by way of ferry ports and light aircraft.

Greater powers are also being introduced to stop people heading abroad to fight – including the cancelation of passports at the border for up to 30 days. Police and Border Force officers will be able to seize the passports and tickets of British citizens if they suspect an individual intends to engage in terrorism-related activities at their destination.

Authorities will also be able to force suspects to move to another part of the country, as part of changes to TPIMs – Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures – amounting to internal exile.

READ MORE: UK set for internal exile of terror suspects

Another counter-radicalization measure is the requirement that schools, colleges and probation providers help “prevent individuals being drawn into terrorism.” This includes banning extremist speakers from campus grounds.

Internet service providers are also required to retain data on so-called internet protocol (IP) addresses to enable authorities to identify individual users.

Aviation security is being tightened. Airlines are required to provide passenger data in advance, including credit card details. If they fail to do so they could be denied landing rights.

Some German airlines have refused to disclose passenger information because of the nation’s stricter data protection laws, but around 90 percent of flights originating from Europe supply this data.

READ MORE: Ransom payments banned under UK anti-terror laws

However, the bill has already been criticized by experts, claiming it threatens civil liberties.

The independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, David Anderson QC, appointed by the UK government, said, “The concern I have about this power and the central concern about it is: where are the courts in all of this?

“One could look at it in terms of young, possibly vulnerable people caught up with the wrong crowd in Syria – didn't really know exactly what they were doing,” he told a committee of MPs.

“Do you want to throw the book at them straight away in terms of arrest and charge? Or is there something to be said, even though you do suspect them of having fought, of keeping them under a very light regime where they might have to report daily to a police station?

“They might have to notify [of] their residence; they might have to go along to meetings with probation or with some similar which perhaps might be for some people be a more sensible way of dealing with them than putting them straight into the criminal justice process.”

Counter-terror bill published, slammed by civil liberty groups

RT -

Home Secretary Theresa May outlined the nine principal elements of the bill, which is the seventh major counter-terror law introduced in Britain since 9/11. However, there have been concerns over a number of proposals, as suspects could use loopholes to avoid the measures.

The bill is aimed at tackling the growing threat posed by Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) which, according to May, have given “energy and a renewed sense of purpose to subversive Islamist organizations and radical leaders” in Britain. She added that the UK faces a greater terror threat than ever before.

One measure introduced is to ban British citizens who have traveled abroad to fight for terrorist groups from reentering the UK. For this, the government outlines cancelation of travel documents, including suspects’ details on British border 'watch lists' and no-fly lists.

“So the message to British nationals participating in terrorism overseas is clear: you will only be allowed to come home on our terms,” May said.

However, legal concerns have arisen from this proposal, as the measure includes a plan to make the individual choose between coming home to Britain and put under monitoring by security services or being banned from the UK for up to two years, even though they will in effect be left stateless.

There are also concerns of possible loopholes that could be used to avoid this measure, by way of ferry ports and light aircraft.

Greater powers are also being introduced to stop people heading abroad to fight – including the cancelation of passports at the border for up to 30 days. Police and Border Force officers will be able to seize the passports and tickets of British citizens if they suspect an individual intends to engage in terrorism-related activities at their destination.

Authorities will also be able to force suspects to move to another part of the country, as part of changes to TPIMs – Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures – amounting to internal exile.

READ MORE: UK set for internal exile of terror suspects

Another counter-radicalization measure is the requirement that schools, colleges and probation providers help “prevent individuals being drawn into terrorism.” This includes banning extremist speakers from campus grounds.

Internet service providers are also required to retain data on so-called internet protocol (IP) addresses to enable authorities to identify individual users.

Aviation security is being tightened. Airlines are required to provide passenger data in advance, including credit card details. If they fail to do so they could be denied landing rights.

Some German airlines have refused to disclose passenger information because of the nation’s stricter data protection laws, but around 90 percent of flights originating from Europe supply this data.

READ MORE: Ransom payments banned under UK anti-terror laws

However, the bill has already been criticized by experts, claiming it threatens civil liberties.

The independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, David Anderson QC, appointed by the UK government, said, “The concern I have about this power and the central concern about it is: where are the courts in all of this?

“One could look at it in terms of young, possibly vulnerable people caught up with the wrong crowd in Syria – didn't really know exactly what they were doing,” he told a committee of MPs.

“Do you want to throw the book at them straight away in terms of arrest and charge? Or is there something to be said, even though you do suspect them of having fought, of keeping them under a very light regime where they might have to report daily to a police station?

“They might have to notify [of] their residence; they might have to go along to meetings with probation or with some similar which perhaps might be for some people be a more sensible way of dealing with them than putting them straight into the criminal justice process.”

Democracy Now! 2014-11-26 Wednesday

Democracy Now! Videos -

Democracy Now! 2014-11-26 Wednesday
    ["
  • Headlines for November 26, 2014
  • ", "
  • \"This Country Values Property Over People\": Ferguson Activist Speaks Out as Protests Spread
  • ", "
  • Rev. Sharpton: Legacy of Civil Rights Movement Shows Need for Feds to Bring Justice if State Fails
  • ", "
  • Mississippi Burning: As Ferguson Erupts, Obama Honors Civil Rights Activists Slain By Klan in 1964
  • ", "
  • \"I Didn't Know What the Sky Looked Like Any More\": Ricky Jackson Exonerated After 39 Years in Jail
  • "]

Download this show

Facebook & other social media blasted for ‘relaxed’ attitude to terror plots

RT -

Speaking to Parliament on Tuesday, Prime Minister David Cameron warned that companies such as Apple, Google, Twitter and Facebook were providing platforms in which terrorists could plan their attacks.

The statements follow a report, published on Tuesday, suggesting the killers of Fusilier Lee Rigby had plotted to ‘kill a soldier’ on Facebook six months before the attack took place.

“Their networks are being used to plot murder and mayhem,” Cameron told Parliament, adding that it was the “social responsibility” of internet companies to report threats to the police.

READ MORE: Britain’s new electronic spy chief says US tech giants aid terror

“If companies know that terrorist acts are being plotted, they have a moral responsibility to act … I cannot think of any reason why they would not tell the authorities,” he said.

The statements echo those made by the PM earlier this month, in which he warned that the internet was becoming an “ungoverned space” which was being exploited by potential terrorist groups.

The government says security services are becoming more concerned that unregulated social media websites are being used to co-ordinate terror attacks. The Metropolitan Police claims it takes down one terror-related post every 10 minutes – equivalent to around 5,000 posts each week.

According to a paper published by Parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC), there was a “significant possibility” that Rigby’s death in Woolwich last year could have been prevented if intelligence officers had access to a private conversation by one of his killers, Michael Adebolawe.

“The party which could have made a difference was the company on whose platform the exchange took place,” the report says.

“There is therefore a risk that, however unintentionally, it provides a safe haven for terrorists to communicate within.”

The ISC report also highlighted problems with current monitoring procedures conducted by UK authorities on social media. Because most of the sites are based in the US, authorization requires a warrant from a US court before they can be searched.

READ MORE: UK warns Britons to be vigilant abroad as ISIS threat grows

Earlier this year, new head of GCHQ Robert Hannigan warned that tech companies were in denial over their platforms being coopted by terror groups, and warned that social media sites were being used as “command and control networks” for criminals.

However, a number of civil liberties campaigners have criticized the report’s proposals, arguing they would do little to curb terror activity, and instead infringe on the privacy of ordinary citizens.

“The committee should not use the appalling murder of Fusilier Rigby as an excuse to justify the further surveillance and monitoring of the entire UK population. To pass the blame to internet companies is to use Fusilier Rigby’s murder to make cheap political points,” said Open Rights Group executive director Jim Killock.

“Mass surveillance erodes the basic trust between citizen and state by treating us all as suspects. If the government keeps finding new ways to justify indiscriminate whole-population trawls, it will be fair to say that we have lost our liberty and the terrorists have won.”

Facebook & other social media blasted for ‘relaxed’ attitude to terror plots

RT -

Speaking to Parliament on Tuesday, Prime Minister David Cameron warned that companies such as Apple, Google, Twitter and Facebook were providing platforms in which terrorists could plan their attacks.

The statements follow a report, published on Tuesday, suggesting the killers of Fusilier Lee Rigby had plotted to ‘kill a soldier’ on Facebook six months before the attack took place.

“Their networks are being used to plot murder and mayhem,” Cameron told Parliament, adding that it was the “social responsibility” of internet companies to report threats to the police.

READ MORE: Britain’s new electronic spy chief says US tech giants aid terror

“If companies know that terrorist acts are being plotted, they have a moral responsibility to act … I cannot think of any reason why they would not tell the authorities,” he said.

The statements echo those made by the PM earlier this month, in which he warned that the internet was becoming an “ungoverned space” which was being exploited by potential terrorist groups.

The government says security services are becoming more concerned that unregulated social media websites are being used to co-ordinate terror attacks. The Metropolitan Police claims it takes down one terror-related post every 10 minutes – equivalent to around 5,000 posts each week.

According to a paper published by Parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC), there was a “significant possibility” that Rigby’s death in Woolwich last year could have been prevented if intelligence officers had access to a private conversation by one of his killers, Michael Adebolawe.

“The party which could have made a difference was the company on whose platform the exchange took place,” the report says.

“There is therefore a risk that, however unintentionally, it provides a safe haven for terrorists to communicate within.”

The ISC report also highlighted problems with current monitoring procedures conducted by UK authorities on social media. Because most of the sites are based in the US, authorization requires a warrant from a US court before they can be searched.

READ MORE: UK warns Britons to be vigilant abroad as ISIS threat grows

Earlier this year, new head of GCHQ Robert Hannigan warned that tech companies were in denial over their platforms being coopted by terror groups, and warned that social media sites were being used as “command and control networks” for criminals.

However, a number of civil liberties campaigners have criticized the report’s proposals, arguing they would do little to curb terror activity, and instead infringe on the privacy of ordinary citizens.

“The committee should not use the appalling murder of Fusilier Rigby as an excuse to justify the further surveillance and monitoring of the entire UK population. To pass the blame to internet companies is to use Fusilier Rigby’s murder to make cheap political points,” said Open Rights Group executive director Jim Killock.

“Mass surveillance erodes the basic trust between citizen and state by treating us all as suspects. If the government keeps finding new ways to justify indiscriminate whole-population trawls, it will be fair to say that we have lost our liberty and the terrorists have won.”

'Black Friday' and 'Cyber Monday' — 4 Scams To Watch Out For While Shopping

The Hacker News -

Holiday Shopping season is really an excited time for both shoppers and retailers, but unfortunately it's a good time for cyber criminals and scammers as well. With Black Friday (28th November 2014) and Cyber Monday (1st December 2014) coming up, you need to be more careful while shopping. These are the two very busy shopping days where shoppers spend millions online. Every eye will be

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