GNOME 3.0 update gone bad

sdack's picture

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Hello,

I have just received the GNOME 3.0 updates for my Debian testing distribution and had to find out the hard way that it is apparently broken. Where do I start to fix this?

What I did was to update from GNOME 2.3 to 3.0 with the help of the Synaptic Package Manager and restarted my Linux box. Despite the new look of it and all icons, themes, images and settings disappearing is my new GNOME 3.0 unusable. The mouse pointer moves, but I do not get menus to open, no right- or left-click does anything and I am stuck with a completely unusable desktop.

If anyone has made the same experience but knows how to fix this mess then please help.

Sven

Re: GNOME 3.0 update gone bad [work-around]

sdack's picture

I have solved the problem by starting with a clean home directory and thereby having all GNOME settings initialized from scratch, like a new user would.

I am now copying as much from my old home directory as possible over to my new home directory. I cannot say that I am happy about it*) but I get to see and work with the new GNOME 3.0 desktop.

Sven

*) Humpty-Dumpty will never be the same again.

Re: GNOME 3.0 update gone bad [work-around]

1's picture

That sounds like too much effort for installing that fat old dwarf.

Why didnt's you simply delete the Gnome configuration directory (perhaps preserving the important ones) from home?

i think most of that Gnome stuff goes into .config...

Re: GNOME 3.0 update gone bad [work-around]

sdack's picture

I did not have time to bother with the details of the new GNOME 3 - coming from GNOME 2 - but needed to continue with my own work. Therefore did I choose to create a new home directory, to solve the issue fast and thoroughly without needing to go into its details.

I wish I had more time to look into it. GNOME 3 looks nice, but it is lacking a lot of the old functionality and uses quite a lot of memory, too. Do you have any suggestions for me?

Re: GNOME 3.0 update gone bad [work-around]

1's picture

I'm not in favour of the integrated graphical environments like gnome and kde. I'm running fluxbox, which has only a role of a window manager: toolbar, menu, shortcuts, background.

This window manager is fast and very light - perfect for a netbook.

One big feature is that your applications are objects that can be acted upon. For example, you can define a chain of actions which run a couple of programs, resize them to a suitable area, distribute them over different virtual desktops and then attach this chain to a key shortcut, or a menu item. You don't even need to hardcode your desired behaviour of an application into the config files, almost everything can be done visually.

I found that fluxbox increased my efficiency a lot.