Ncurses for touch screens?

Nick Lidakis's picture

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On Wed, May 25, 2011 at 10:35:24AM +0100, Darac Marjal wrote:
> On Tue, May 24, 2011 at 08:55:36PM -0400, Nick Lidakis wrote:
> > I was wondering if there was some kind of ncurses application or utility that
> > would let you define simple ASCII buttons and when that button was pressed
> > using gpm or a touchscreen it would run a simple command. I tried searching
> > with apt-cache but nothing showed up; nothing using Google either.
>
> Perhaps not the most simple of solutions, but as you're willing to learn
> some sort of definition language anyway (i.e. where to place buttons,
> what they say, what they do), why not look into coding something in
> perl / python / ruby. They all come with ncurses libraries and aren't
> that hard to pick up.

Thanks for the advice. I did find a used O'Reilly book called Learning
Python. Also, there is something called python-mpd client library in the
Debian repository and I found a program called easympc. Easympc
(http://code.google.com/p/easympc/) is a simple curses client written in
python. Perhaps is can be modified for my needs.

Though, I don't have any experience programming anything. I also found
something called whiptail that might be pressed into service into a simple
mpd client remote using dialog buttons and executing and mpc command.

Ncurses for touch screens?

Doug's picture

On 05/27/2011 07:36 PM, Nick Lidakis wrote:
> On Wed, May 25, 2011 at 10:35:24AM +0100, Darac Marjal wrote:
>>
/snip/
> Thanks for the advice. I did find a used O'Reilly book called Learning
> Python. Also, there is something called python-mpd client library in the
> Debian repository and I found a program called easympc. Easympc
> (http://code.google.com/p/easympc/) is a simple curses client written in
> python. Perhaps is can be modified for my needs.
>
>
/snip/
Look for a free on-line 150 page book, "Snake Wrangling for Kids," by
Jason R. Briggs. It will teach you Python, and it's not just for kids,
in spite
of the title. Before you download the book, be aware that there are two
different releases of Python, and two releases of the book, so find out
what Python release (2.x or 3.0) you have or can get before downloading
the book. (Many recent releases of Linux distros still have the earlier
Python in the repo. I just checked PCLOS, and it has the older one.)

--doug